The Rivington School or Wat
David Mora Catlett

From the book Rivington School or Wat by Amr G. Shaker:

'“I’d rather keep my hands dirty and my art clean.” These are the words of David Mora, a Mexican artist who believes in the public function of art. It is this need for communication that Mora puts to use in his canvases as well as on the fences that he paints on. In them, Mora often illustrates sceneries of everyday life which are close to the people and which –as he says- are addressed to the people.

The interesting feature in Mora’s work, however, lies in the form of his paintings and not merely in their subject matter. In fact, his colorful sceneries often take shape with the viewer taking perspective. At this point, one can only wonder if this subtlety –often a trademark of his work- serves to emphasize the “function” of his art or whether it represents a new approach to abstraction. Perhaps it is even both!

For David Mora’s following, time will certainly prove to be an interesting surprise…'

 


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Amsterdam

Amsterdam

Domino Players

Domino Players

Arleen Collage

Arleen Collage

Assistant to Elizabeth Catletts, inc

Assistant to Elizabeth Catletts,inc

Cellist, 1992

Cellist

Cowboys

Cowboys

Dino Man

Dino Man

Echos

Echos

Flirt, 1983

Flirt

Man and Dogs

Man and Dogs

Market

Market

Pick Up Time

Pick Up Time

Shopping Bag Lady

Shopping Bag Lady

Sitting Skating Girl

Sitting Skating Girl

Subway 2

Subway 2

Subway 5, 1988

Subway 5

Thompkins Square, 1983

Thompkins Square

Weaving, 1996

Weaving

What's Up, 1990

What's Up

Where Is It

Where Is It

All images 1980-2009 rivingtonschool.com and photos 1980-2009 Toyo Tsuchiya and may not be used or distributed without permission.